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Enterobacteriaceae

 Enterobacteriaceae (9830-11) Reinforce your knowledge and skills as you use nomenclature, cultural characteristics, identification techniques and pathogenicity to differentiate Escherichia, Shigella, Salmonella, Enterobacter and other clinically significant isolates.

Code 9830-11
Level Basic

Member Price

$0

Non-Member Price

$110

 

Additional Details

PEP hours: 8
CPS credits: 0
Level: Basic
Course Type: Express

Start Date: Upon registration
Completion: Up to 52 weeks
Delivery: PDF via email

Prerequisites: None
Textbook: N/A
Equipment: Computer with Internet is required

Learning Outcomes:
Enterobacteriaceae

  • List the common characteristics of the family Enterobacteriaceae.
  • List the three Enterobacteriaceae most commonly isolated from clinical specimens.

Escherichia

  • Describe typical colonies on blood and MacConkey agar.
  • State typical reactions for:
  1. Glucose
  2. Lactose
  3. TSI
  4. ONPG
  5. Indole
  6. Voges-Proskauer
  7. Citrate
  8. Motility
  9. Lysine
  • State how rapid identification of E. coli may be carried out.
  • List infections commonly caused by E. coli.
  • List the four types that cause enteric disease
  • Know the significance of an ESBL producer.

Shigella

  • Name the genus most closely related to Shigella.
  • Describe colonies on MacConkey agar.
  • State the suitability of SS, XLD, HE, tetrathionate, selenite and GN broth for isolation of Shigella.
  • State typical reactions for:
  1. Motility
  2. Lactose
  3. Phenylalanine deaminase
  4. Glucose
  5. Sucrose
  6. Urease
  • State how species identification is established.
  • Describe the procedure for serogrouping.
  • Explain why serotyping would be done.
  • Describe the pathogenicity.

Edwardsiella

  • State reactions that would distinguish Edwardsiella from E. coli and from Salmonella species.
  • State the clinical significance.

Salmonella

  • Describe typical colonies on Mac, SS, XLD, SS, HE and bismuth sulfide media.
  • State typical reactions for:
  1. Glucose
  2. TSI
  3. Motility
  4. Indole
  5. Citrate
  6. Phenylalanine deaminase
  7. Urease
  8. ONPG
  9. Lysine decarboxylase
  • State reactions that may differentiate S. typhi from other Salmonella species.
  • Outline the steps in serological identification.
  • Describe the infection caused by S. typhi and state what specimens are best for diagnosis at various stages of disease.
  • Describe the pathogenicity of the other Salmonella species and state the specimen required for diagnosis.
  • State the usual bacterial reservoir of Salmonella species.

Citrobacter

  • Compare reactions of Citrobacter freundii with those of Salmonella species in:
  1. TSI
  2. ONPG
  3. Lysine decarboxylase
  • Describe the pathogenicity of Citrobacter

Klebsiella

  • Name the two most commonly isolated species.
  • Describe typical colonies on MacConkey agar and state the incidence of capsules.
  • State typical reactions for K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca for:
  1. Glucose
  2. Lactose
  3. TSI
  4. Motility
  5. Citrate
  6. Indole
  7. Ornithine decarboxylase
  • List common infections and describe the role of Klebsiella in nosocomial infections.

Enterobacter

  • Name the two species most commonly isolated from clinical material.
  • Describe typical colonies of Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae on MacConkey agar.
  • State the colour of pigment produced by E. sakazakii and Pantoea (Enterobacter) agglomerans.
  • State typical reactions of Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae for:
  1. Glucose
  2. Lactose
  3. TSI
  4. Motility
  5. Citrate
  6. Indole
  7. Ornithine decarboxylase
  • Describe the clinical significance of Enterobacter aerogenes, E. cloacae and E. sakazakii.

Hafnia

  • State the genus most similar to Hafnia in biochemical reactions.
  • Describe typical colonies on MacConkey agar. Compare Hafnia and Shigella in the following tests:
  1. TSI
  2. Motility
  3. Shigella Antisera
  • State the clinical significance

Serratia

  • Name the species most commonly isolated from clinical material.
  • Describe the pigment occasionally seen.
  • Describe colonies on MacConkey agar.
  • State reactions of Serratia marcescens for:
  1. DNase
  2. Glucose
  3. Lactose
  4. Sucrose
  5. TSI
  6. Phenylalanine deaminase
  7. Arabinose
  • Describe the pathogenicity of S.marcescens and its role in nosocomial infections

Proteus

  • Name the three species recognized as human pathogens
  • Describe typical colonies on blood, MacConkey and stool media
  • State typical reactions for:
  1. Glucose
  2. Lactose
  3. Sucrose
  4. H2S
  5. TSI
  6. Phenylalanine deaminase
  7. Urease
  8. Indole
  • State the significance in stool cultures
  • Describe pathogenicity

Morganella

  • Name the one species
  • Describe colonies on blood and MacConkey agar
  • State typical reactions for:
  1. Glucose
  2. Lactose
  3. Sucrose
  4. H2S
  5. TSI
  6. Phenylalanine deaminase
  7. Urease
  • Describe the clinical significance

Providencia

  • Name the two species most often isolated from clinical specimens
  • Describe colonies on blood and MacConkey agar
  • State typical reactions for:
  1. Glucose
  2. Lactose
  3. Sucrose
  4. H2S
  5. TSI
  6. Phenylalanine deaminase
  7. Urease
  • Describe the clinical significance

Yersinia

  • Name the three species that are well recognized as human pathogens.
  • State the optimum temperature range for growth.
  • Describe the suitability of the following media for isolation of Y. enterocolitica:
  1. Blood agar
  2. MacConkey agar
  3. SS agar
  4. Cold enrichment
  5. CIN agar
  • Describe typical colonies of Y. enterocolitica on blood and CIN agar.
  • List six characteristics that may indicate Y. enterocolitica.
  • Describe the pathogenicity of Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis.

Author/Instructor: Helen Smith, MLT
Version Date: December 2011